Just Batteries - Energy Storage

 

One of the most important uses is in demand-charge management, where large energy-intensive customers buy power when electricity is cheap and store it for use at peak times when power is most expensive. For power utilities and grid operators, batteries are being paired with renewables, to smooth out wind and solar farm output and to stabilize the difference between demand and supply.

Market

The growing interest in grid-scale battery farms stems from the need to ensure power grid stability as reliance on intermittent renewable power grows.

Grid-connected energy storage capacity could increase more than nine-fold, from just 3 gigawatts (GW) in 2016 to 28 GW by 2022 and nearly double to 52 GW by 2025, boosted by rapidly falling prices of Lithium-ion batteries to below R2700 per kilowatt-hour by 2019.

Lithium-ion batteries, which currently account for around 95% of all battery energy storage installations, are the chief beneficiaries of falling prices as ABB, Tesla, Toshiba, and Panasonic, ramp up production to achieve economies of scale.

On the other side of the world, Tesla has recently completed a 100 MW lithium-ion storage facility in South Australia. Elsewhere, South Africa’s main utility, Eskom, has identified a need for as much as 2,000 MW of energy storage on its networks to accommodate the expansion of renewable power from independent power producers. To find the most suitable battery storage technology Eskom has opened a testing facility in Johannesburg.

Grid-scale battery technologies are dominated by lithium ion, but others, such as nickel metal hydride and flow batteries, are becoming increasingly commercially viable. Lithium-ion is the most common rechargeable grid-scale battery technology on the market, which first became commercially available in the early 1990s. This technology is growing in popularity due to its lightweight, high energy density, and ability to recharge.

The nickel metal hydride battery builds on early innovations derived from nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries. Though similar in many ways to lithium-ion batteries, their use is very limited in grid-scale energy storage. In contrast, rechargeable flow battery technology is based on two chemicals dissolved in liquid, separated by a membrane through which an ion exchange occurs and this generates an electric current.

Flow battery technology offers a long life cycle, flexible capacity and much higher power densities than the more popular lithium-ion battery. As a result, this makes them better for applications where rapid charge and discharge takes place over a short time period, such as in frequency response services and demand spike management.

Types of grid-scale batteries

Grid-scale battery technologies are dominated by lithium ion, but others, such as nickel metal hydride and flow batteries, are becoming increasingly commercially viable. Lithium-ion is the most common rechargeable grid-scale battery technology on the market, which first became commercially available in the early 1990s. This technology is growing in popularity due to its lightweight, high energy density, and ability to recharge.

The nickel metal hydride battery builds on early innovations derived from nickel-cadmium rechargeable batteries. Though similar in many ways to lithium-ion batteries, their use is very limited in grid-scale energy storage. In contrast, rechargeable flow battery technology is based on two chemicals dissolved in liquid, separated by a membrane through which an ion exchange occurs and this generates an electric current.

 

Just Batteries provides customized energy solutions to customers across Africa. Our expertise extends to all major chemical systems, with products exported around the world.

We represent some of the world’s leading battery brands in Africa, and combined with a highly skilled engineering team, Just Batteries offers battery pack design and assembly to create specialized products and services for our customers.

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